How Much More Can We Take: COVID-19 and Mental Health

Written by Teresa Prytko 

Covid-19 is so much more than a virus. It has single-handedly affected the mental health of people everywhere, especially college students. According to a new BestColleges.com survey, 95% of college students have experienced negative mental health symptoms as a result of COVID-19-related circumstances. We have been told that college was supposed to be the best four years of our lives, but what is so great about Zoom meetings and isolation? More importantly, what is being done to combat this?  

Covid has clearly influenced the way we learn. Despite this, it can be easy to feel that there has not been a heavy emphasis on the question of how we can change our approach to learning. Instead of being forced to respond to changes, it could be more beneficial to take an active approach. Perhaps looking into one of the main causes of stress, coursework, could be the key.  

Leah Scontras, a junior resident on campus, commented on her experience with the major shift.

“Out of five professors, I would say only two took action,” she said. “Some did nothing.”

We cannot be expected to produce the same level of work that we would have prior to the pandemic, with Scontras sharing that as a first-year she “had more motivation.”

This lack of motivation does not only refer to assignments for classes but also seeps down to participation in clubs and activities and the maintenance of relationships.  

Personally, I recall hearing more about rules and regulations than I did support and resources when I transferred to Assumption as a second year. However, that was over a year ago.

Timothy Gangemi, a transfer as well although more recent, commented on this matter saying that he is “glad they’re reducing Covid restrictions.”

Perhaps by loosening the emphasis on restriction and guidelines there can be more room to look into these other matters such as the mental health of students and faculty which should always be number one no matter what.